Make your own free website on Tripod.com

This site is not supported any more

The site was moved to http://www.setupgroup.com/xo

Update your bookmarks



Click here to contact meMark Okun's Home Page
           
Find Welcome X & O Five-to-row
games
Four-to-row
games
Othello
games
Chess Checkers Go games Misc

Othello
games

Ataxx
Othello
Reverse-Othello
History of Othello
Links
 
Contact me
 

History of Othello

The origin of Othello is not known. There is not any proof of rumours that Othello arose from an old Chinese game called "Fan Mian" (claimed in E. O. Harbin, "Games of Many Nations", Abingdon Press, 1954). Lewis Waterman and John W. Mollett (both of London, England) both marketed games with similar rules in 1880. Mollett's game was called Annexation and was played on a cross-shaped board. Waterman's game was called Reversi and played on the familiar 8x8 square board. It is unclear whose version came first, but Waterman's board and name are in use today. Walter H. Peel wrote a book, Handbook of Reversi, published by Waterman's firm Jacques and Sons in London 1888, and this book was reprinted in various guises over the next decade.

Reversi differs from Othello in two respects.

  • In Reversi, the board starts empty, and in each of the first two turns each player plays a stone of his own colour in one of the centre four squares. In Othello, this is done for you, eliminating one of the starting configurations of Reversi.
  • If you are unable to play at Reversi, you miss your turn. However, once someone has used up all 32 of his discs, the person with discs left gets to play all of the last moves.
The modern rules of Othello were invented by Goro Hasegawa in 1971.